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Match Dates for July Are:

July 13th 3 Gun

July 19th  IDPA Bug Gun

July 26th IDPA Night Match


2014 is here and we are ready for another year of a great shooting sport. We are ready to see our regular shooters and meet some new shooters to become part of our shooting family. As most of you know new IDPA rules were implimented in Oct of 2013. There are some important changes that you need to make youself aware of since the penalty of some are automatic DQ. We had to disqualify some shooters last year due to these rules. Now these rules are about safety and as much as anyone hates to be Disqualified the safety officers hate to have to DQ people as well. But they are simple rules that can be prevented by making safe handing a everyday practice. Here are a couple of the rules you MUST be aware of.


1. MUZZLE Rule. The safety officer will specify the were the safe line is either by showing each shooter or the lines being visibly marked. Most times the lines will not be marked due to the amount of movement in IDPA. If a shooter turns his muzzle up range or breaks the imaginary barrier, the shooter will be Disqualified immeadiatly. This rule is enforced regaurdless of what match we are having. We are a family orianted range were people come to watch and children play on the playground on the hill. When your muzzle turns up range it is the safety officers duty to redirect you by puttin his hands on you or worst case stepping in front of the firearm to insure the safety of everyone around you. IDPA has never had a major accident and we want to keep it that way not only in IDPA but at the CKPS range.

2. Finger Rule. YOU WILL GET ONE WARNING AND A PROC PENELTY. THIS WILL BE MARKED ON YOUR SCORE SHEET. THE SECOND CALL IN A MATCH WILL RESULT IN A DISQUALIFICATION.  Everyone knows I HOPE that you do not put your finger on the trigger until you are prepared to destroy what you are pointing your firearm at. This was a big problem for people to change there habbits. The problem may not have been the finger on the actual trigger but the finger was close enough that it appeared to the safety officer that the finger was on the trigger. We had some people get upset when DQ'd and claim there finger was not on the trigger. This may or may not have been the truth but if the safety officer observes the finger on or appearing to be on the trigger we have no choice but to follow the rules. Especialy for those who plan on shooting major matches were there is no argument and the match director will trust his safety officers to make that call. Here is some simple advice to insure that you will not be called for a finger. IF YOU ARE NOT SHOOTING AT THE TARGET(S) OR MOVING FROM POSITION TO ANOTHER POSITION THAT DOES NOT HAVE ANY SHOOTING REQUIRED WHILE MOVING THEN CLEARLY PUT YOUR FINGER AWAY FROM THE TRIGGER. ADVICE IS, IF YOU NORMALY PUT YOUR FINGER ON THE TRIGGER GAURD WHEN YOU MOVE OR ARE NOT SHOOTING THIS CAN APPEAR TO THE SAFETY OFFICER THAT IS RUNNING BEHIND YOU THAT YOUR FINGER IS INSIDE THE TRIGGER GAURD. TO AVOID THIS CONFUSION PUT YOUR TRIGGER FINGER CLEARLY ON THE FRAME OF THE FIREARM. FOR SOME OF YOU THIS WILL TAKE PRACTICE TO MAKE IT MUSCLE MEMORY. BUT IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO BE DQ'd THEN I SUGGEST PRACTICING THIS UNTIL IT BECOMES HABBIT. THIS IS AN IDPA RULE BUT WILL BE PRACTICED ON EVERY MATCH BECAUSE IT IS A SAFETY RULE. We never want to see anyone get hurt. And remember that people do fall during matches and if your finger is on the trigger there is a very good chance that the firearm will go off. (which some shooters have first hand experiance at). Best case is a automatic DQ but reality is that there is a very good chance that when your firearm discharges in this situation you could end up harming your self or worse some innocent spectator. But accidents do happen and having muzzle awarness is just as important. When this incident happened to a friend of ours he had excelant muzzle awarness and his pistol never pointed anywere but down range. So practice practice practice and keep your trigger finger on the frame. If your finger is on the trigger while moving because you know around the corner there are targets you will get a finger call. Until you see them and are ready to shoot at them your finger CAN NOT be on the trigger.

There are other rule changes in safety, Movement while reloading and several others. It is your responsiblity to go to IDPA website and download or read the rule book. Weather you are a member or not if you plan to shoot IDPA matches then it is up to you to be aware of the rules. Saftey officers will help explain things you are unsure of, answer questions or even tell you how they will see things. Every safety officer is differnt but consistant on how they call rules. Safety officers do not make up there own rules or make exeptions but it is good to learn your safety officer. Example im a fat guy with a bad knee so you will outrun me if you move fast between positions. So the angle i am likley to see your pistol and finger postitions differntly then another safety officer who is able to keep up.

And just some general changes and things you need to know:
The Cheif safety officer will be the person with the timmer. They will give you the range commands to begin with. When the buzzer goes off the main duty is to keep his eyes trained on the weapon. Watching you finger, control of the firearm, muzzle control etc. If at any time you drop the loaded firearm the shooter is to step back and let the firearm fall (DO NOT TRY TO CATCH IT) The Cheif safety officer will pick up the firearm, clear it, declare it safe and give it back to the shooter and the shooter will be disqualified. When disqualified you can stay and watch the match, you can help paste and interact but you can not shoot the rest of that match. At any time the Chief safety officer conciders you unsafe with a firearm maybe beause of nerves the SO may talk to you aside. At any time you have questions about the match or rules you may allways ask the safety officer.
The score keeper does not just write down your scores. He is responsible for making sure the surroundings are safe, watching the shooter to make sure he is not breaking cover or any muzzle planes and all the stuff the CSO can not see from his position. The score keeper will also call penalties, May have a better vantage point on your trigger then the CSO. So in short the score keeper is a safety officer who is watching all the things the other safety officer can not see. They have also been very helpful when it comes to finger calls. WHen i see what i thought was the finger on the trigger because of a bad vantage point. But the other safety officer was in perfect position that he could clearly tell the finger was on the gaurd. Our goal is to make sure every one is safe. And after that we want ever one to have fun.


 Please check the IDPA website for equipment information and what class your firearm puts you in. There have been some equipment changes and firearm class changes. Cover (vest or shirt that covers firearm and extra mags) is required for each IDPA match. No nylon holsters, No weapon mounted lights, No lasers. IDPA is not a race gun sport. No race guns are alowed. No tungston guide rods or race holsters. All of the modifications to firearms allowed or not allowed is on the IDPA site. If you are still unsure you can contact me and i will try to answer your questions.

Remember safety first. We want to have as much fun as you can have and meet new people. Jeff is allways looking for help so volenteers to help set up or comiming up with stage ideas is allways appreciated. Most people have no idea the amount of time and sacrifices Jeff makes so that we can all have a good time. Please help tear down after the match, Pick up trash, Tell Jeff thank you for his hard work and magnificant job he has done with the range. Those of us that were part of it in the beginning know how far it has come and plans to get bigger. So remember lets all help out, practice, and be safe and lets get ready to kick off 2014